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Welcome, 77 artists, 40 different points of Attica welcomes you by singing Erotokritos an epic romance written at 1713 by Vitsentzos Kornaros

Friday, June 24, 2016

Mumford & Sons Tickets @ The Greek Theatre in Los Angeles, CA Sept. 20th & 21st On Sale Today To The General Public at TicketProcess.com

… Austin 5000 Tour at the Greek Theatre in Los Angeles, CA … new tour dates at the Greek Theatre now mark the beginning … popularity in the US. The Greek Theatre was built in 1929 … : Mumford & Sons Tickets @ The Greek Theatre in Los Angeles, CA …


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€2.3B to be invested in Greece within TAP

… world, head of SOCAR Energy Greece Anar Mammadov said.   According to … will directly be invested in Greece. The project will launch 8 …


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Czechia, Hungary, Slovakia, and Greece are ready to leave EU

… well as in the Mediterranean, Greece first of all. Second, we … Europe, as well as in Greece, one can carry out referendums …


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Brexit Bloodbath Spills Over to Athens Stock Exchange

Greek stocks spiraled downwards in one of the biggest single-day losses in the Athens Stock Exchange on Friday. The Greek market was gripped by the frenzy of the global turmoil caused by a UK Brexit vote that marks the country’s departure from the European Union. It was the lowest level that the Greek market had


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Elder Paisios Predicted the Brexit 20 Years Ago

Elder Paisios, a Greek saint that is the Nostradamus of Greece, was canonized last year. The well-known monk of Mount Athos was considered a sage ascetic and was sought after for advice by many believers. Twenty years ago, he had prophecies that the destruction of the European Union would start in the UK. “It won’t


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Global markets are in chaos after UK votes to leave EU (DIA, SPX, SPY, QQQ, TLT, GBPUSD, USD, GBP, JPY)

The UK has voted to leave the EU, and this stunning result is sending US stocks through the floor. The Dow plunged more than 600 points to the lows of the session in the final hour of the trading session on Friday.[Screen Shot 2016 06 24 at 3.19.28 PM]Investing.comThe S&P 500 was equally getting slammed, with all its ten sectors in the red. Both indexes turned negative for the year.  Banking stocks were sharply lower, with Morgan Stanley falling by as much as 10%.  [sp500]Investing.comThe Nasdaq had its biggest drop since November 2011, falling 196 points, or 4% . The referendum outcome means the UK will begin preparations to leave the European Union, the first member to leave the 28-member bloc since its formation in 1993. This market reaction reflects how unprecedented Brexit is, as there's no precedent to study what it means for the global economy.  "It's hard to imagine that we would not be in a period of heightened volatility" leading up to the start of the Brexit negotiations in the fall, said Tony Bedikian, head of global markets at Citizens Bank. "If history is any judge, typically, with that sort of uncertainty, the risk-off trade can have some additional legs to it," he told Business Insider." Several markets are in turmoil following Thursday's vote, with some of the most stunning moves you'll ever see in developed-market indexes and currencies taking place.  Headlining the proceedings is a mind-blowing drop in the British pound, which fell over 10% against the US dollar to about $1.33, a 31-year low. It's the worst single-day drop ever for the currency. [Screen Shot 2016 06 24 at 11.26.44 AM]Investing.com London's FTSE fell by as much as 4.4%.[ftse]Investing.com Germany's DAX lost more than 7% at one point. Combined, European stocks had their worst drop since 2008. [dax]Investing.comUS Treasury bonds are catching a massive bid with the 10-year Treasury yield falling to as low as 1.48% (bond prices rise when yields fall). [10year]Investing.com NOW WATCH: FORMER GREEK FINANCE MINISTER: The single largest threat to the global economy


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Anti-establishment tsunami sweeps Europe

Greece Golden Dawn, one of Europe's most far-right parties, became a true political power during Greece's 2012 elections. The party was fueled by harsh austerity measures, high unemployment and illegal immigrants coming over Greece's borders. Golden Dawn ...


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GREEK Cypriots delaying resolution: Turkish Cypriot FM

All GREEK Cypriots are trying to do is leave the current negotiation process hanging, Foreign Minister of the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus, ...


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GREEK PM urges Europe to return to more humane roots

To that end, and in anticipation of the Spanish election results, GREEK government officials have already contacted the offices of French President ...


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Victory For Brexit 'Leave' Shows Us Why Trump Is Succeeding In America

To put it simply, creating a unified currency meant that fiscally irresponsible countries, like Greece and Portugal, could create large deficits in their countries, knowing that their old drachmas and escudos would enjoy more stability under the euro ...


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GREEK hotel refuses to exchange pounds after Brexit currency turmoil

A GREEK hotel is refusing to exchange tourists' pounds after the Brexit vote sent the currency into turmoil. Since the result of the referendum was ...


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Archbishop Demetrios, from Council, Speaks with TNH

CRETE, GREECE – Geron Archbishop Demetrios of America, while attending the Holy and Great Council (also called the Great Synod) told TNH about his overall experience, about the Council’s work,...


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Japanese Heroic Tale During Asia Minor Catastrophe

The Asia Minor catastrophe, as it came to be known, put an end to three thousand years of Greek presence in Asia Minor as a million refugees were pushed out to the harbor from a burning city on September 8, 1922. French, British and United States ships ...


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WWUTT: Galatians 3:28, There is No Male or Female?

There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is neither male nor female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus! Paul is very simply saying that in Christ: no one is inferior, and no one is superior. Jews can’t consider themselves ...


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LGBT Community Pens Open Letter to the Greek Orthodox Church

Your All-Holiness, Holinesses, Beatitudes, Eminences and Graces, dear Fathers, brothers and sisters, dear delegates of the Holy and Great Council, The European Forum of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Christian Groups, an ecumenical association of ...


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Britain Exits The European Union: Will The EU Survive And Should America Care If It Does?

Economic hardship also has elevated Euroskeptics of varying degrees on the left in Greece and Portugal, and may do so in Spain as well. In Hungary and Poland autocratic, traditionalist conservative governments often find themselves at odds with the EU.


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Tourist worried in Greece after hotel cash sign

… for a Nottingham holidaymaker in Greece when he couldn't … already! We're in Greece, no cash exchange & no … already! We're in Greece, no cash exchange & no …


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Study Counts Cost Of Tax Evasion In Greece

… by the study is that Greece's relatively high number … overall number of companies in Greece, paid 61 percent of the … , a significant factor underlying the Greek fiscal crisis, remains a major …


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GREECE: Greek Far Right Group Golden Dawn Praises Brexit Decision June 24

… voted to leave the EU, Greece?s far-right Golden Dawn political … for national independence in a Greece where wealth is allocated to …


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Syrian Teenager Shot While Trying to Cross Border Back to Turkey

A teenage Syrian refugee, aged 16, has been lightly injured after being shot by an unknown assailant while trying to illegally re-enter Turkey, from which he had entered Greece earlier. The young refugee and an older Iraqi, aged 21, had entered a small inflatable dinghy and tried to cross the Evros river, Greece’s northeastern border


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Greek Church Prays for LGBT Abnormality, Ahead of Thessaloniki Pride

Members of the Greek Orthodox Church held an all-night prayer vigil on Thursday, ahead of the Thessaloniki Pride Festival due to take place at the capital of Macedonia from June 24-25. The festival has been denounced by church members as a “festival of abnormality and dishonor.” Church spokesman Father Stephanos said that the vigil is


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A pyrrhic victory? Boris Johnson wakes up to the costs of Brexit

Vote Leave’s poster boy should have been crowing, so why was his post-referendum press conference so subdued? “If we are victorious in one more battle … we shall be utterly ruined.” Like the good intellectual that he’s vigorously pretended not to be of late, Boris Johnson will probably know that line. It’s from the Greek historian Plutarch’s account of the battle that gave us the phrase “pyrrhic victory”, the kind of victory won at such cost that you almost wish you’d lost. Continue reading...


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GREEK community digests Brexit vote

Following the European Commission targeting the GREEK shipping tax regime over the past few months and changes in UK taxation as well, Brexit only ...


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The Hungry Chum: How one man creates a world inside a GREEK cafe

Among a dollar store, a pie shop, and a bank hides Antonio's GREEK Bakery and Cafe. After dealing with the lack of bike racks by locking our bikes to a ...


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Alexis Tsipras, GREEK PM: EU needs 'change of course' in light of British exit vote

GREEK Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras gives a speech during an Economy conference, in Lagonisi southeast of Athens, on Thursday, June 22, 2016.


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Greece accepts final Type 214 submarines into service

The Hellenic Navy officially inducted its final two Type 214HN diesel-electric attack submarines into service on 23 June. The flag-raising ceremony for HS Matrozos (S-122) and HS Katsonis (S-123) at the Skaramangas Shipyard in Athens finally concluded ...


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Russian Tourism to Greece Rose 523% in March

The number of tourists heading to Greece from Russia rose to 523 percent in March compared to the same period in the previous year, according to a study by Pay Pal and Data Insight of the Russian Association of Tourist Agents. “The increase was noted ...


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British Holidaymakers to Greece Suffer From Brexit Backlash

British tourists claimed they were being refused cash withdrawals and exchanges following the Brexit win. No sooner was the vote announced that fund access was cut as there was no rate set by the Central European Bank for the British pound as it slid ...


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VAROUFAKIS: Brexit means that the 'EU’s disintegration is now running at full speed'

[Yanis Varoufakis] Former Greek finance minister and outspoken political activist Yanis Varoufakis believes that the historic vote to leave the European Union by the United Kingdom is a harbinger of the end of the EU. Writing in a post on the blog OpenDemocracy on Friday, Varoufakis said that while he is skeptical of the EU's current structure, the decision to exit the group by Britain was a mistake. "OUT won because the EU establishment have made it impossible, through their anti-democratic reign (not to mention the asphyxiation of weaker countries like Greece), for the people of Britain to imagine a democratic EU," wrote Varoufakis. "Our radical IN campaign was thus defeated." Varoufakis had been campaigning for the "Remain" camp for some time, arguing that change should come from inside the EU rather than leaving it altogether. However, Varoufakis has been critical of the Union's leadership for some time and believes their inability to allow for the "voices of democrats" lead to the decision by British voters. Varoufakis is best known for his own clash with the EU establishment during the Greek credit crisis in 2015, but has been an advocate for European cooperation for some time. One of his efforts towards that goal was forming the group DiEM25. The group's goals are to reform the EU and have a pan-European parliament established by 2025. Clearly, the Brexit appears to be a setback for such goals, but Varoufakis said he is not discouraged. "DiEM25 regrets that the British people chose to leave the EU," he wrote on OpenDemocracy. "But at the same time, DiEM25 welcomes the British people’s determination to tackle the diminution of democratic sovereignty caused by the gross de-politicization of political decisions and the consequent democratic deficit in the EU." Varoufakis also took the chance to criticize what he called the "business-as-usual" ideas of politicians that have contributed to the "loss of EU’s legitimacy, integrity and soul." READ THE FULL OP-ED AT OPENDEMOCRACY» SEE ALSO: BREXIT HAS EVERYONE SCARED OF A RECESSION Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: YANIS VAROUFAKIS: Brexit won't help Britain regain sovereignty


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Basically, Brexit was a tantrum - what should we do about it?

[David Cameron] The strangest thing about Brexit is that, of all the members of the European Union, Britain had the weakest case that it would be better off leaving. Britain had managed to get itself a deal where it got only the good bits of the EU — free trade and an integrated market, and free movement of people within the union — while keeping its own currency and its own passport controls. The British relationship with Europe was a model for what a slimmed-down, good-parts-only European Union should have come to look like. If anybody should have wanted to leave, it's Greece, which has been forced into fiscal and monetary policies that are impoverishing its populace. Or Germany, which will be on the hook indefinitely to repeatedly give Greece just enough money to stave off political collapse. Instead, Britain is leaving, while Greece commits to mass unemployment essentially forever. You may have noticed a theme in my writing recently: That maintaining a flawed status quo can be preferable to radical change, especially when that change is in an uncertain direction. Just because the EU is deeply flawed does not mean leaving it will make things better for Britain — especially when the worst part of the EU (the euro) will still be there, hobbling Britain's trading partners, even as Britain's own economy falters due to uncertainty and new economic barriers. The reaction from financial markets has been swift and negative, a fact that matters a lot for ordinary people, not just those who are invested in British stocks or had bets on exchange rates. Stock prices are falling because Brexit makes business investment in Britain less appealing. That will mean fewer jobs and less wage growth. Homebuilder stocks are much lower because fewer people are going to be able to afford to buy homes in Britain. The weaker pound will mean higher prices in Britain almost immediately for gasoline and other goods that trade on global markets; in other words, ordinary British people's real incomes have already fallen due to this vote. Stock markets are lower around the world because Britain's exit from the EU is likely to reduce global economic output. There are silver linings: The falling pound is a symptom of reduced economic prospects for Britain, but it is also a stabilizing device that will make British exporting firms more competitive, helping to offset a likely decline in domestic demand. [Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump gestures following a news conference, at his Turnberry golf course, in Turnberry, Scotland, Britain June 24, 2016. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne ] Tourism is an export, and Donald Trump is right that a lower pound will induce more foreigners to come play at his Scottish golf course, so long as they're not turned off by the Trump name. This is a good time to book a vacation to London. But as Larry Summers notes, Brexit will also cause economic harm on the continent, which will not be offset by a similarly sharp weakening of the euro (which has weakened against the dollar today but strengthened against the pound). This will make the economic situation even more dire in southern Europe, with increased political instability likely to follow. The rush by investors out of the pound and into the yen will hamper efforts to inflate and stimulate the economy in Japan. Instability in Europe also means a stronger dollar, which will hurt American exports. If all this instability were likely to change the EU for the better in the long run, it might be worth it. But Brexit does nothing about the two biggest problems in Europe: the unsuitability of the euro for many of its members, and public dissatisfaction with the failure of European governments to control migration into Europe. The not-so-secret idea behind the euro — that fiscal integration would come later, whether the public wants it or not, because it is necessary to make the eurozone work — was foolish, because European countries lack the political will to support each other fiscally at great, ongoing expense. It's become a clichĂ© to say that monetary union is impossible without fiscal union, but the eurozone countries seem determined to find out how long it is possible to go on with one but not the other. Fiscal integration is very expensive for the rich bits of a fiscal union. Connecticut sends several percentage points of its GDP every year in fiscal transfers (that is, federal taxes that exceed federal spending into Connecticut) to support poorer states like Mississippi. Connecticut has several reasons for putting up with that — being part of the United States raises productivity overall, there is a sense that we are all Americans in this together, and we've been doing it for over 200 years — but I have no expectations that German and Dutch voters will ever willingly sign up for a similar deal with Greece. Because a eurozone breakup is unthinkable and European fiscal integration is unpopular, the unsustainable status quo in the eurozone is likely to be sustained for a long time, causing great misery in countries like Greece and Spain. Brexit does nothing to fix it — and ongoing economic weakness on the continent will continue to be contagious to Britain. On the migration question, Britain already has the passport controls it needs to keep unauthorized migrants out. The Brexit vote reflected a desire to reduce authorized immigration, but it's not clear it will achieve that end — lots of legal immigration is already from outside the EU, and Britain is likely to have to agree to free movement from EU countries if it wishes to maintain its trading relationship with them, as Switzerland and Norway have done. Basically, Brexit was a tantrum. Britons looked at an institution that was flawed and unresponsive and did a thing that doesn't fix the flaws and hurts Britain's own economy. This vote reflects the error of direct democracy: The British public made a bad choice, and there's a reason we usually have voters delegate decision-making to informed elected officials instead of deciding policy on their own. But the vote also reflects the errors and hubris of European political elites, who gave voters an institution so flawed and so allegedly irreversible that they felt compelled to act out in whatever way was available to them. The acting-out options available to voters on the continent — far-right parties like the National Front — may be worse than Brexit. The best case scenario is that Brexit leads to a rethink in Brussels, and an effort to produce an EU that is more accountable and leaner — and ultimately, to find a way to unwind the euro, which will never work well without a fiscal union, which the people of Europe will never want. But I am not holding my breath for that. The likelier outcome is more muddling through, more economic stagnation, and more voter anger — all of which will have to be managed without Britain as a partner. SEE ALSO: AN ANTI-BREXIT POLITICIAN ASKED THE QUESTION VOTERS ALL OVER THE WORLD SHOULD CONSIDER Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: 'You’re a sleaze!': Here are all the insults Trump hurled at the press during a bizarre press conference


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The Latest: Greek Extremists Hail British Vote

An extreme right political party in Greece has hailed Britain's referendum result to leave the European Union as a victory for nationalism across Europe. Nikolaos Michaloliakos, leader of the Golden Dawn party, called for a similar vote to be held in Greece.


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All-Orthodox Meeting Begins in Greece

Leaders of the world’s Eastern Orthodox churches have begun an historic meeting in Greece to discuss the church’s role in the modern world. It was intended to be the first time in more than a thousand years that all the self-governing branches of ...


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Home GREEK news Brexit Vote a Result of Europe's Handling of the 2008 Crisis, GREEK...

brexit In the Brexit vote returned by the UK referendum, Europe was seeing the results of its own response to the financial crisis, GREEK government ...


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'Immigrants Will Come to the UK, Regardless of Brexit'

According to GREEK journalist Paschos Mandravelis, the reasons for leaving the EU have been stirred up by populist groups such as UKIP, and this is a ...


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Brexit: These countries could be next now that Britain has left the EU

Greek newspaper Kathimerini fears that this ongoing crisis combined with a Brexit could ultimately become a threat to Greece's EU membership status. "Athens's main concern should be that a victory for Leave will weaken the eurozone's resolve to bolster ...


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UK holidaymakers in Greece are refused cash exchange or withdrawal after Brexit

Brits abroad in Greece have claimed they were refused … a ATM machine in Athens, Greece And others said how they … already! "We’re in Greece, no cash exchange & no … @BBCNottingham we're in Greece - no cash exchange or …


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Previewing Greek Fest 2016

One of Milwaukee's favorite festivals kicks off today! Greek Fest 2016 starts today, June 24, and runs through Sunday, June 26. Joining us with a preview of all the events and, of course, the food, are Diana Papachristou and Greg Karvelas. The 51st Annual ...


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GREEK foundation unveils new Athens opera, national library

ATHENS: A leading GREEK foundation on Friday unveiled a sprawling new park, opera and national library in southern Athens designed to "give hope" ...


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Fredrik Eklund Not Invited To Ryan Serhant's GREEK Wedding

Fredrik Eklund filmed his island wedding to Derek Kaplan for Million Dollar Listing: New York and it was a small wedding for family and friends. Eklund ...


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GREEK islands and capital mark World Refugee Day with sport, chess and art

The main event in the GREEK capital was an Olive Wreath Run on Wednesday from the Acropolis Museum to the courtyard of the Zappeion exhibition ...


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‘Brexit’ Vote Wreaks Havoc in Markets

Europe’s fragile markets took a more severe lashing: Greece down 13.5%, Spain 11%, Italy 11%, its worst day in decades. So furious was the selling pressure in Italy that most Italian bank stocks simply didn’t open for trading: There were no buyers even ...


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DeMarcus Cousins once again appeared to take a shot at the Sacramento Kings in social media after their draft trade

[DeMarcus Cousins]Ed Szczepanski/USA TODAY Sports Last night's NBA draft was filled with surprises, as always. Unfortunately, they're not always good surprises and Sacramento Kings center DeMarcus Cousins seems to have been a victim of one of the bad ones. The Kings held the No. 8 pick in the draft, but traded it in exchange for the No. 13 and No. 28 picks, and then used the first one on a relatively unknown Greek center named Georgios Papagiannis. Cousins had this to say about it: Tweet Embed: https://twitter.com/mims/statuses/746149291249410050 Lord give me the strength 🙏🏿 What's most head-scratching about this choice is that they traded away a chance to get guard Marquese Chriss (who's actually from Sacramento) and address a positional need and took a center, a position where they obviously already have established talent at. It seems that Cousins' relationship with the Kings organization still isn't the best and it doesn't seem like this will help very much. NOW WATCH: 8 awesome facts about golf phenom Jordan Spieth


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Brexit: global reaction to Britain's vote to leave the EU

The United Kingdom has voted by a close margin to leave the European Union. Here, experts from around the world react to the news which has sent shockwaves around the world and what it means for their country. This article will update. ------------------------- FRANCE FRÉDÉRIQUE BERROD, PROFESSOR OF PUBLIC LAW, SCIENCES PO STRASBOURG AND ANTOINE ULLESTAD, PHD CANDIDATE IN EUROPEAN LAW, UNIVERSITY OF STRASBOURG It’s no surprise that a sense of disaster dominated the French media’s reaction to news that the UK had voted for a Brexit, with many underlying the “winds of panic” and the “start of a real cataclysm” in the markets. While some papers spoke of the shock of the decision, others were not surprised, talking instead about how it marked a defeat for the European Union, described as “complete” by the columnist Laurent Joffin in the left-leaning _Liberation_ newspaper. >  The independent website MĂ©diapart used a brilliant oxymoron, describing the decision as a “welcome catastrophe” and arguing that Brexit offers a unique opportunity for reform of the long-criticised EU. The result highlighted how the political class in France remains very divided over Europe. On one hand the Eurosceptics, led by the Front National’s Marine le Pen, have saluted the UK’s “clear lesson in democracy” and called for a similar referendum in France. On the other side, those politicians on the left who are in power, such as French foreign minister Jean-Marc Ayrault, want Europe to “react and find the confidence of its people”. President François Hollande, after a cabinet meeting and talks with European Commission President Donald Tusk and his German counterpart Angela Merket, said the decision was “severely testing the European Union”. The secretary of state for reform Thierry Mandon said: “The referendum [in France] is scheduled, it’s the presidential elections.” The European project will be at the heart of the 2017 race. Questions dominate the coverage in the regional press – with papers wondering what the impact will be on French politics, whether the EU can survive a Brexit, and what will happen next – reflecting the gamble on which the future on the EU now lies. _ClĂ©ment Louis Kolopp contributed to this section._ ------------------------- UNITED STATES SCOTT LUCAS, PROFESSOR OF INTERNATIONAL POLITICS, UNIVERSITY OF BIRMINGHAM One consequence of Britain’s vote to leave the European Union will be damage to the US-UK “special relationship” that has been a pillar of Britain’s political, economic, and military strategy since 1945. Brexit campaigners have insisted that the UK can easily replace its economic position within the EU with the primacy of links with the US. That assertion – whether from genuine belief or political manoeuvring – is misguided. From the interlinked creation of NATO and the EU’s ancestors, such as the European Economic Community, to the support of Western Europe as a bulwark against Soviet Communism, America’s economic and political strategists have built their approach on a UK inside Europe, not detached from it. The current US leadership has not been shy about reasserting this. To the contrary, the US president, Barack Obama, made clear in March that the UK would be at the “back of the queue” for trade deals if Brexit triumphed. Former high-level officials – used as channels for the views of those who now hold their positions – spoke of the negative effects not only on Britain’s economic future but on relationships within diplomatic, military, and intelligence partnerships. The US-UK relationship rests on institutions which prefer security and certainty. Given that the UK – which may not be “united” in the near future if Scotland departs – is entering a period of protracted insecurity and uncertainty, Washington will not be looking at “Independence Day” in England and Wales as an asset, but as a problem. ------------------------- DANIEL CHIROT, HERBERT J. ELLISON PROFESSOR OF RUSSIAN AND EURASIAN STUDIES, UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON After the referendum, British opinion remains badly split. The typical “Leave” voter is similar to supporters of Donald Trump in the US and National Front voters in France. Xenophobic, angry nationalist and isolationist parties have been rising all over Europe. This is the revolt of the losers who feel marginalised by globalisation. Perceptions of economic insecurity, unwelcome cultural change, intrusion of untraditional, foreign ideas, and a sense of national decline have produced a massive backlash against ruling establishments. Sadly, the closure to the outside world they demand, if carried out, would plunge much of the world into economic depression and cause immense international conflict. We would be back in the 1930s, heading for disaster. Alarmingly, the losers’ anger is also a revolt against the liberal Enlightenment values of tolerance and openness to progressive ideas that seemed, only 25 years ago, to finally have prevailed. Similar threats in the 20th century were ultimately reversed by the defeat of first fascism and then communism, but are now back. Only reinvigorated economic growth, better protection for the inevitable losers of globalisation and greater sympathy for their frustrations can ease their anger. Establishment parties of the moderate right and left have failed to help. Unless they do, the crisis will continue to worsen. The referendum’s results solve nothing. ------------------------- RUSSIA ALEXANDER TITOV, LECTURER IN MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY, QUEEN’S UNIVERSITY BELFAST The reaction to the Leave victory in Russia, which was alleged to be in favour of Brexit, centred on the likely impact on its relations with the EU and the possible economic fallout. The finance minister Anton Siluanov said that Brexit was likely to be less significant for Russia’s economy than shocks it has experienced over the past two years. Aleksei Kudrin, an ex-finance minister and influential adviser to President Vladimir Putin, tweeted that there won’t be an economic catastrophe, but both the EU and UK would be weaker economically in the long run. Other Russian politicians have been less reserved in their reaction, with the nationalist-minded among them predicting that Brexit is only a start of the EU dissolution. Vladimir Zhirinovsky, a firebrand leader of the main nationalist party in the Russian Duma, praised the Leave vote. “The people of Britain made the right choice – the rural, the working class of Britain said “no” to the union created by the financial mafia, the globalists and all others.” He added: “Now we hope that Trump will win.” Moderate politicians were more cautious in their reaction. Konstantin Kosachev, an influential chairman of the Federation Council’s (the upper chamber) committee for international affairs, said he hoped that Brexit would spur reforms to make the EU less politicised, more flexible and open to cooperation with international partners, including Russia. He also expressed concerns over possible economic fallout: > We have interest in the EU as a stable inter-generational project, > because it’s still one of our biggest trade partners. 49% of > Russia’s foreign trade is with the EU, and even under the > sanctions regime it’s still significant. Any shock in such an > important trade partner will impact our relations in a negative way. ------------------------- POLAND ALEKS SZCZERBIAK, PROFESSOR OF POLITICS AND CONTEMPORARY EUROPEAN STUDIES, UNIVERSITY OF SUSSEX The British EU referendum result has raised a number of concerns in Poland. There is uncertainty about what will happen to 800,000 Poles currently working in the UK. There are concerns about what impact the UK’s exit will have on the EU budget, as Poland is currently the largest beneficiary of the EU’s regional funding. More broadly, there are concerns that the departure of the largest non-Eurozone member of the EU could marginalise Poland if power is increasingly concentrated among the states that are part of the single currency. The current Polish government, led since autumn 2015 by the right-wing Law and Justice party (PiS), will also lose its key ally among the large EU states. The government has shifted away from the previous administration’s prioritisation of relations with Germany and has been trying to develop a strategic partnership with the UK. PiS sits in the same European Parliament group as the British Conservatives. It saw the UK as a natural ally given its shared stance on anti-federalism in the EU, and on particular issues of concern to Poland such as the EU’s relations with Russia. ------------------------- AUSTRALIA MARK BEESON, PROFESSOR OF INTERNATIONAL POLITICS, MURDOCH UNIVERSITY As the world reacts to the UK’s decision to leave the EU, the significant and long-lasting economic damage that is likely to ensue will inevitably get most attention in the short term. The rest of the EU will want to make life as difficult as possible for Britain to deter others from following in its wake. Young Britons looking to escape their insular, parochial and incredibly short-sighted and badly led homeland may need to look further afield than Europe. The good news is that Australia might get a flood of applications from talented prospective citizens. The bad news is that Britain will be a diminished international force with limited capacity to play the sort of role some conservative commentators in this country fondly imagine. It is hardly a coincidence that those in Australia who want the country to become a republic have a renewed spring in their step as they consider political folly on an epic scale. ------------------------- GREECE DIMITRIOS GIANNOULOPOULOS, COLLEGE ASSOCIATE DEAN, BRUNEL UNIVERSITY LONDON Shock, disbelief and fear. This has been the initial Greek reaction to Brexit. This time a year ago the Greek referendum was being announced and the threat of “Grexit” loomed over Europe. The banks closed, capital controls were introduced and the socio-economic and political trauma continues to haunt people today. The country was, however, beginning to have glimmers of hope that a period of stability lay ahead. Brexit will prove them wrong. It has opened a Pandora’s box, for Greece and for Europe. The impact on the Greek economy will be disastrous: between the 2009 global economic crisis and the post-Brexit crisis that is about to unleash its full force, the Greek economy has suffered terrible blows. To believe it will survive a protracted period of economic uncertainty in Europe is wishful thinking. At least this time Greek politicians do not have any illusions. “The forecasts have been proven wrong. Hope has been denied. A great adventure begins,” said Giorgos Koumoutsakos, spokesperson for the Greek conservative party, New Democracy. On a dark day like this, we can rejoice at least that not everyone has given up on Europe. MPs from many political parties in Greece are speaking with one voice, about the need to stop the march of populism, create barriers to nationalism and build new bridges to stop isolationism in Europe. They call for a new vision for Europe, and want to be part of it. But a spokesperson for Greece’s right-wing fascist Golden Dawn party, congratulated the British people for saying no to the “German rulers of Europe” and “Brussels' scavengers”. ------------------------- BELGIUM CLÉMENT JADOT, PHD CANDIDATE, DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE, UNIVERSITÉ LIBRE DE BRUXELLES As fervent federalists, some Belgians may have occasionally dreamed that a Brexit would open a new window of opportunity for deeper and faster integration within Europe without the UK dragging its heels, but the truth is that all the major political parties were strongly supportive of Bremain. From a Belgian perspective, Brexit is bad news, both economically and politically. Economically speaking, Belgium is an open economy, strongly bonded to the UK, and political elites fear stress on the banking market as well as a deterioration of the national trade balance as a consequence. The referendum’s political consequences for Belgium are not straightforward. On the one hand, most of the country’s political parties will probably call for a common front in order to go beyond the shock and to push European integration forward, as did the prime minister Charles Michel this morning. >  On the other hand, regional ambitions and populism in the north of the country will certainly be nourished by the Brexit vote, as well as in the rest of the EU. On a short term basis, the Flemish nationalists of the N-VA, will be the first to be impacted by the Brexit. With the departure of the British Conservatives from the EU bloc, they lose a strategic ally and an ideological model. In the past, Belgium and the UK always looked very differently at the EU. Yet, because they are historical, political, strategic and economic allies, it is in their mutual interest that this friendship never ends. _More to follow…_ [The Conversation] _Dimitrios Giannoulopoulos is founder and firector of the Brunel-University based Britain in Europe think tank._ _Aleks Szczerbiak, Alexander Titov, Antoine Ullestad, ClĂ©ment Jadot, Daniel Chirot, FrĂ©dĂ©rique Berrod, Mark Beeson, and Scott Lucas do not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond the academic appointment above._


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Ancient Europeans may have been first wine makers

Thanks to a new method of analyzing the chemicals in liquids absorbed by clay containers, researchers have uncorked the oldest solid evidence of grape-based wine making in Europe, and possibly the world, at a site in northern Greece. Chemical markers of ...


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Greece Condemns State-Sanctioned Quran Readings at Hagia Sophia

Last year, a Muslim cleric recited the Quran in the Hagia Sophia for the first time in 85 years to mark the opening of an exhibition. But this Ramadan the Turkish authorities have gone a step further, with the state TV religion channel Diyanet TV ...


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Enjoy a massive range of Greek cuisine & traditional music, but where?

The Milwaukee Greek Fest is a free event hosted by the Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church to celebrate the Greek community of Milwaukee. Guests can sample from a massive range of authentic cuisine and enjoy traditional Greek music performed by bands like ...


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Salmonella outbreak from novel serotype reported in Greece

Eleven Salmonella isolates with an unusual antigenic type have been identified by the National Reference Laboratory for Salmonella and Shigella (NRLSS) in Greece. The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles were indistinguishable and no apparent ...


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The Right Left for Europe

And, crucially, Iceland, unlike Greece and the UK, never entered the EU. Back in the 1990s, I campaigned against Greece’s entry into the eurozone, just like Britain’s Labour Party leader, Jeremy Corbyn, campaigned in the 1970s against joining the EU.


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Chinese e-Commerce Giant Alibaba Coming to Greece

Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba, a growing force in Internet market sales challenging Amazon, will come to Greece in September.


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Is Grexit Next After Brexit? Greek Stock Market Leads Europe In Losses After British Referendum

Markets around the world convulsed Friday after citizens in the U.K. voted to reject their membership in the European Union. But no major European market suffered so much as Greece’s, suggesting investors are worried Greece might follow Britain’s lead.


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