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Saturday, June 6, 2015

Crash causes outages in Greece; woman accused of DWI

A crash early Saturday in Greece caused utility outages for several hours and led to a DWI arrest. Shortly before 4 a.m., a vehicle struck a utility pole ...


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT www.democratandchronicle.com

UNHCR reinforces presence in Greece

The situation in Greece is exacerbated by the dismal economic situation in the country. And there are no official facilities for those awaiting registration, ...


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT en.radiovaticana.va

Greece's Tsipras to Meet With Germany's Merkel and France's Hollande

ATHENS—Greece's Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras is expected to meet with German Chancellor Angela Merkel and France's President Fran├žois ...


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'Facebook saved my life after I plunged 350ft off clifftop on Greek holiday island'

Teetering on a ledge over a 1,000ft drop, the only thing keeping Sandi Allcock from certain death was the olive tree which had abruptly halted her ...


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT www.mirror.co.uk

EU chief Jean-Claude Juncker refuses to talk to Greek PM Alexis Tsipras

"It is clear that the Greek government cannot under any circumstances consent to absurd proposals," Tsipras said, while arguing Athens was close to ...


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT economictimes.indiatimes.com

Greek PM Tsipras warns lenders not to 'humiliate' Greece

Alexis Tsipras accuses Greece's international creditors of backtracking on recently-agreed measures and of failing to see the need for an end to Greek ...


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT www.maltatoday.com.mt

Whether Greece does a deal or defaults, the prospects seem equally grim – The Guardian

As Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras and his finance minister Yanis Varoufakis have discovered the hard way, international financial deal-making is a world away from the thrill of a barnstorming election campaign, the Guardian reported. But with Varoufakis sidelined ...


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT en.enikos.gr

Greek PM to hold talks with Merkel, Hollande in Brussels on Wednesday

ATHENS (Reuters) - Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras will hold talks with German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Francois Hollande on the sidelines of a summit in Brussels on Wednesday, a Greek government official said on Saturday. The three leaders held a teleconference on Saturday, which the official said was held in a "good climate", without giving details on the content of the call. Greece is locked in a standoff with its euro zone and IMF creditors over an aid package aimed at unlocking money for the cash-strapped country. ...


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT uk.news.yahoo.com

National Bank Of Greece (ADR) (NBG): Grexit Fears Rise With Missed IMF Payment

Greece has missed its latest €300 million ($335 million) debt payment to the International Monetary Fund, for the first time during its six-year long crisis ...


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Greece calls bailout plan absurd

Making it clear that above all these negotiations is the grand politics of the Eurozone: The creditors, with their demands for cuts, and Greece with two ...


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'Greek snap poll possible'

Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras was presented with a compromise deal from lenders that crossed many of his “red lines”, including tax hikes and ...


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT www.timesofmalta.com

Greek, German, French leaders holding call over Greek debt stand-off

A Greek government official said the call between Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President ...


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT www.reuters.com

Tsipras Says Greek Creditors' Plan is 'Unrealistic' But closer to a deal

Speaking to parliament in Athens late Friday, the embattled Greek leader went on the attack after telling German Chancellor Angela Merkel and ...


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT www.forexfactory.com

Putin can Bail us out, Says Greek Minister

ATHENS: A senior Greek minister has suggested the embattled country could turn to Russia for financial assistance, as he accused creditors of ...


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT www.newindianexpress.com

EU's Juncker snubs Greek PM after 'absurd' debt deal rebuff

BRUSSELS/ATHENS (Reuters) - The European Union's chief executive declined to speak to Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras on Saturday after the leftist leader rejected as "absurd" international creditors' terms for a cash-for-reform deal to keep his country from default.


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT feeds.reuters.com

Greece denies report that Juncker declined to take call from Tsipras

A Greek government official on Saturday denied a media report that European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker had declined to take a phone call from Greek President Alexis Tsipras over Greece's ongoing debt crisis. Reuters earlier reported that Juncker had refused to take the call on Saturday because Athens had not yet sent in reform proposals that it had promised for Thursday, meaning there was no basis on which to hold further discussions.


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT uk.news.yahoo.com

Thomson flight to Greece is diverted to Bulgaria after Brit holidaymakers' drunken row

A flight full of British holidaymakers bound for Greece had to be diverted to Bulgaria due to the 'disgusting' behaviour of drunk passengers.


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT www.mirror.co.uk

Issues and questions of the week: Will Greece default on its debts?

Greece appears to lack the cash as well as the political will to pay. Instead, it is banking on reaching a deal with creditors to unlock some of the €7.2 ...


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT www.irishtimes.com

Greece Has Some Loans to Repay

The IMF has urged Greece to take advantage of bundling for ages now, but officials demurred, lest Greek citizens assume it means Greece's official ...


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT www.marketminder.com

SYRIZA holds firm in polls, eight in 10 still want euro

An opinion poll published over the weekend showed SYRIZA holding a strong lead of 23.6 percent over New Democracy, while eight in 10 Greeks said they wanted to remain in the eurozone.


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT www.ekathimerini.com

This Week in World War I, June 6-12, 1915

British and ANZAC Troops Landing at Sulva Bay, August 6, 1915 Gallipoli: The Ground War By the beginning of June 1915, the stalemate that had ensued in the Gallipoli campaign prompted Lord Kitchener, the British Secretary of State for War, to decide to commit even more troops to Gallipoli. In Britain, still without conscription, a new campaign to enlist more troops was initiated. In June and July 1915, almost 50,000 fresh troops were sent to reinforce the 80,000 already in the Dardanelles. Allied Landings in Gallipoli, April-August 1915 The stalemate dragged on into the summer as Allied troops suffered in the scorching heat and disease-ridden conditions. In July the British reinforced the bridgehead at Anzac Cove. The following month, on August 6, 20,000 fresh reinforcements attempted to seize the Sari Bair heights by landing troops at Suvla Bay, to the north. The plan was to drive across the peninsula and cut off Turkish forces in the South. In the face of Ottoman counter-attacks, the initiative failed within days. ANZAC Cemetery at Gallipoli The landings on Suvla Bay marked the start of a general offensive by the Allied troops to break out of their beachheads. Commanded by Mustafa Kemal, Turkish reinforcements were brought up and thrown into the battle, and once again the Allies failed to make any significant advances. The casualties were terrible. The Allies lost over 45,000 men in the first ten days of the offensive. Ottoman losses were almost 40,000. In mid-October, Kitchener replaced Hamilton with Lt. General Sir Charles Munroe. He immediately recommended to Kitchener a complete withdrawal from Gallipoli even though, he believed, it could cost another 40,000 casualties to do so. Following a personal inspection by Kitchener in November, the order was given to withdraw. Allied Troops Under Fire at Gallipoli The troops were evacuated by the end of January 1916. Despite pouring in half a million men, the Allies had been unable to take the south of the Gallipoli peninsula and link up their beachheads, let alone march to Constantinople. Allied forces had suffered over 250,000 casualties of which 50,000 had been killed. Turkish casualties were between 250,000 and 350,000. A final potential catastrophe was averted. Over 119,000 men were evacuated safely. Turkish soldiers, refusing to attack, just let them go. Evacuation from Gallipoli, January 1916 There was one other consequence of the Gallipoli campaign. It was there that the legend of the Anzac's would be forged. Approximately 17,000 Australian and New Zealand troops had landed on the Aegean side of the Gallipoli peninsula in April of 1915. They were called the" Anzacs," short for the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps. British Military planners, too lazy to keep writing out the full name, had conveniently shortened it to Anzac. It was as the Anzacs that they would fight in the suffocating heat and the wretched, stinking conditions of Gallipoli and it was as the Anzacs that they would pass into history and into legend. ANZAC Troops Preparing to Depart for Egypt, Albany Western Australia 1914 They came as "Empire Men," loyal members of a British Empire that then spanned a quarter of the globe. Few had ever seen the mother country, most never would, but they were the products of its culture, its heritage and its institutions. When king and country called, they answered by the thousands. Almost half a million Australians and New Zealanders would ultimately see action in the Great War. They would fight and they would die. At Gallipoli two out of every three Anzacs would be killed or wounded fighting in a war they did not start, for a mother country they had never seen. It was at Gallipoli that they would begin to forge a national identity. They may have come as "Empire Men," but they would leave with a budding consciousness that first and foremost they were Australians and New Zealanders. It was also at Gallipoli that a young Australian journalist named Keith Murdoch, the father of media tycoon Rupert Murdoch, would achieve international fame for his account of the military bungling that characterized the campaign. Keith Murdock In the end, militarily, the Gallipoli campaign achieved nothing. The Ottoman Empire was not knocked out of the war. The Turkish military proved itself to be far more formidable, especially in a defensive role, than it had been given credit for. No new lifelines to Russia were established, the Eastern Front was not expanded and the stalemate between the two sides continued. Encouraged by the Ottoman success, Bulgaria declared for the Central powers. Greece, in order to avert an attack from Bulgaria, promptly joined the Allies. The only thing that did change was the continuing and ever escalating toll of casualties. When it came to the body count, there was no stalemate. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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Two suspects arrested for Palestinian’s fatal stabbing

A 40-year-old Albanian man and a 31-year-old Bulgarian woman were arrested on manslaughter charges for the fatal stabbing of a 35-year-old Palestinian man in June last year, Greek police announced on Saturday.


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Putin: Speculation on Grexit is counterproductive

Greece has the sovereign right to decide which unions and zones it wishes to be a member of, Russian President Vladimir Putin told Italian daily Corriere della Sera.


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Greek pharmacists to strike on Wednesday

Pharmacists across Greece will hold a 24-hour strike on Wednesday, their national union announced on Saturday.


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Greek Coach Giorgos Donis Leads Al-Hilal to Winners Podium

The finale of the King Cup football tournament between Al-Nasr and Al-Hilal teams at King Abdullah Stadium in Jeddah on Friday took a happy turn with the help of the Greek football coach Giorgos Donis. Al-Hilal beat Al-Nasr 7-6 in a penalty shootout and lifted the trophy for the seventh time in its history after the match drew 1-1. Fabian Estogianof’s Al Nasr preceded in the score in the 92′ minute, but Al-Hilal equalized and scored in the 119′ minute by the defender Mohammad Jahfali. Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Salman graced the King’s Cup final at King Abdullah Sports City in Jeddah on Friday evening.


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT greece.greekreporter.com

The never-ending Greek drama will help the Brexit supporters

There is no chance whatsoever this turbulent Greek drama is reaching any kind of denouement. There are many more acts to come.


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT www.telegraph.co.uk

Tsipras to seek support for Greek proposals as pressure for deal builds

Tsipras has indicated that he is unwilling to make further concessions to creditors but sources suggested the Greek side could cede some ground on ...


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT www.ekathimerini.com

Turkish Cypriot leader envisions reunification 'within months'

Turkish Cypriot president Mustafa Akinci says divided Cyprus will reunite within a matter of months. But he will have to overcome reluctance on the internationally recognized Greek side first.


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CANADA STOCKS-TSX falls as investors seek clarity on Greece, Fed rate hike

"Markets in the last two days have been caught in the crossroads of Greece, the uncertain implications of its debt problems on the future of the euro ...


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Tsipras: Greece needs debt relief

"Currency unions are easier to get into than to get out of, and we really don't know the consequences of (an exit by Greece)," he said. "There would be ...


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT www.irishexaminer.com

Greece may call snap election to break impasse

Greece delayed repayment of an IMF loan yesterday and a deputy minister said Athens might call snap elections to break an impasse with lenders that ...


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German Politicians Refuse to Give Any More to Greece

FRANKFURT—Leading German politicians Saturday refused to grant Greece further concessions in turn for additional bailout funds and said that the ...


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China's Cruise Ship Disaster Is World News, So Why Is Beijing Censoring Information About It?

Every week, The WorldPost asks an expert to shed light on a topic that's making headlines around the world. Today, we speak with Jeremy Goldkorn, the founder and director of Danwei. China suffered one of the worst maritime disasters in its recent history this week when a cruise ship with more than 400 people aboard capsized in the Yangtze river. The four-deck Eastern Star was on its way from the city of Nanjing to the city of Chongqing on Monday night when it encountered a severe storm and overturned. Fourteen people survived the tragedy, including the ship's captain and first engineer. Rescue teams had recovered 103 bodies by Friday night. More than 300 passengers remain missing. Chinese authorities have severely restricted access to information about both the causes of the tragedy and the efforts to recover the victims' bodies. In recent days, however, families of passengers across the country have increasingly voiced frustration with that lack of information. On Wednesday night, several family members forced their way through a police cordon to get to the disaster site, and on Friday a relative of two of the passengers burst into a press conference demanding an investigation into possible human error. The WorldPost spoke with Jeremy Goldkorn about the way Chinese authorities are handling the flow of information about the tragedy. Goldkorn is the founder and director of Danwei, a research firm that tracks Chinese media and Internet. Several media outlets reported this week that Chinese authorities have kept a tight lid on information about the maritime disaster in Jianli. What are Chinese leaders aiming to accomplish by restricting information? To put it in historical perspective, the Chinese Communist Party has always controlled information about disasters very tightly. The handling of the aftermath of disasters is obviously the government's responsibility, but there's also a long-held belief in the country that even the occurrence of natural disasters can in some way be seen as the government's fault. After the Tangshan earthquake in the 1976, the government basically tried to prevent any spread of information. The government has been a lot more transparent in recent years, partly because the Internet has made complete coverups impossible. A look back at the Wenzhou train crash of 2011 helps explain the authorities' current reaction, because it was the first time social media made the government lose control of the narrative. In the weekend of the Wenzhou accident, most of the information about the train crash came from citizens who were posting on Weibo (a Twitter-like microblog service). The government was one step behind ordinary people writing about the tragedy and criticizing the government's response. That really woke up the government to the possibility of social media, and there have been a number of measures put in place since then, not only to control narratives about natural disasters but also political dissent. In the case of the cruise ship sinking, social media is certainly highly censored, and there is a lot of pro-government propaganda on social media talking about how the government is doing a good job. Rescuers prepare near the capsized ship Eastern Star after it was righted by cranes on the Yangtze River in Jianli county of southern China's Hubei province. How does the information that Chinese readers and viewers received about this tragedy differ from what an international audience gets to see? There have been tight restrictions on Chinese news media. They're kept away from the scene and told to rely on the authorized copy put out by the Xinhua news agency. International reporters have also struggled with access, but they certainly have greater freedom to report and publish what they want since they don’t take their orders from the propaganda department or the state council's information office. So in terms of actual reporting, foreign reporters have not had an easy time either, but they have much more latitude about what the organization ends up writing or broadcasting. Has there been a public demand for more information? There hasn’t been any kind of well-organized campaign, and if anyone tried to start one it would be wiped off the Internet. It looks like there have been some attempts by citizens to demand more information from the government or from the cruise company, and these have been repressed. In Shanghai for example, there were scuffles between relatives of people who were probably victims and the police, and it appears those people were trying to get information. Divers transports a dead body next to rescue workers near the sunken passenger ship in the Yangtze river in Jianli. Do you think the Chinese authorities' strategy is successful or counterproductive in the long run? It is successful in limiting any kind of damage to the government's reputation in the short term, but one of the country's problems is that there's a tremendous lack of trust in Chinese society. Most people are suspicious of the story that they’re getting from the government. They usually won’t say that publicly, but one of the reasons why you get people clashing with the police is because they don’t believe what they’re getting told. This happens pretty much every time there’s a disaster of some kind. We saw it this week, we saw it when the Malaysian Airlines plane disappeared and after the New Year’s Eve stampede in Shanghai at the beginning of this year. So it is a successful strategy to minimize any kind of organized threat to the rule of the Communist Party, both in the immediate and long run, but it doesn’t do the Chinese government any good in building a society where there is more trust, both between citizens and also from citizens to the government. People are unable to organize dissent, but they aren't really going to believe in President Xi Jinping's much propagandized "Chinese Dream" either. This article has been condensed and edited for clarity. More from The WorldPost's Weekly Interview Series: - What Palestinian Membership In The ICC Really Means - Anguish In Argentina After Prosecutor's Mysterious Death - Could The New Syriza Government Be Good For Greece's Economy? - Naming The Dead: One Group's Struggle To Record Deaths From U.S. Drone Strikes In Pakistan -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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Whatever Happened To ... Greece Towne Mall?

Greece Towne Mall was the first suburban mall in the Rochester area when it opened in 1967. The mall came five years after Midtown Plaza debuted ...


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Greece's Delay: A Goodbye Wave Or A Fistful Of Euros For Markets?

Stock and bond markets reacted pointedly in the past week to the possibility that Greece is near a goodbye wave to the eurozone. The wave was ...


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Greece slams 'irrational' proposals

"There is no question of our accepting an agreement that does not contain the prospect of debt restructuring" that would help Greece regain the market ...


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Juncker spurns Tsipras meeting

Commission president rejects talks following Greek PM’s fiery speech


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Greece to resume debt talks after Tspiras rejects 'absurd' terms

ATHENS/GARMISCH-PARTENKIRCHEN, Germany (Reuters) - Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras will resume talks with euro zone lenders in Brussels next week after telling parliament he rejected the creditors' "absurd" terms for a cash-for-reform deal to keep his country from default.


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Do-Dah Parade steps off today; art fairs, Greek Fest continue in Kalamazoo

The Kalamazoo Institute of Art Fair, Art on the Mall and the Greek Festival all continue today, and the Kalamazoo Library and Ladies Library are ...


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Rescue Package May Be Extended Until Autumn

According to a barrage of reports in the German media during the last few days, there is a high likelihood of Greece’s current bailout program being extended until autumn. At the same time, Greece’s Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras expressed his confidence that the Greek government is close to an agreement with its international creditors despite the fact that he rejected the European proposal delivered by European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker on behalf of the Institutions. Speaking in his parliament about the current bailout talks on Friday afternoon, Alexis Tsipras stated that he will not sign a new Memorandum for Greece implying that the possibility of the Greek program’s extension remains open. Closing his Parliamentary speech, the Greek PM stressed that there is no time limit for the negotiations between the Greek government and the European creditors, because of the fact that they should only aim at a definite agreement regarding the Greece’s debt settlement. Given the fact that the Greek side is unable to satisfy the Institutions’ demands regarding the imposition of additional restrictive measures, there is a great necessity for Europe to appeal more medium than long term character decisions. Meanwhile, a government source close to Alexis Tsipras explained last night in the Greek Parliament that “any agreement reached should be capable of solving any issues arise.” There are several reports in Berlin referring to the extension of the current Greek assistance program. “Technically this step can not be avoided. Greece should survive this summer,” circles adjacent to negotiations told “Wel.t” “Frankfurter Allgemeine” reported that Greece’s lenders wish the extension of the Greek bailout program in order to make available to Athens the vital amount of about 10.9 billion euros for the recapitalization of the Greek banks. In return, they will ask, among other things, the reduction of all pensions by 1% of GDP and a continuation of the privatization program. Journalists from “Handelsblatt” say that ECB, EU and IMF circles estimate that no agreement will be reached regarding a third rescue program in June. Meanwhile, the leaders of the seven world’s biggest economies will meet in Bavaria in order to discuss the global economic outlook. Greece will be present during the G-7 summit, hosted by German Chancellor Angela Merkel, as the negotiations with the Institutions are now in a very critical phase and developments do not leave anyone indifferent.


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT greece.greekreporter.com

Greek PM Tsipras warns lenders bailout plans 'not realistic'

Greece's prime minister has warned international creditors not to impose humiliating terms on his country as it seeks urgently needed bailout funds.


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT www.bbc.com

IMF: ‘We Did Not Suggest Greece Bundles the Payments into One’

The standoff between Greece and its international creditors is heating up after the Greek government’s decision not to make the €300 million payment to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) on Friday and wrap June’s four payments into one due at the end of the month. IMF officials refuted that they suggested Greece the bundling of payments for June, an Athens’ move discussed extensively on an international level because of the fact that Greece is the first country to do so after Zambia in the 1980s. The Greek request on Thursday had caused the dissatisfaction of IMF managing director Christine Lagarde who had stated confidently that Athens would pay its dose on Friday. Greek politician Dimitris Papadimoulis told reporters on Friday that the IMF suggested this solution, while Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis said that the bundling of doses was not something requested by Athens. According to information released by journalist Michalis Ignatiou in Greek media, IMF denies that it advised Greece to wrap its four installments for June into one due at the end of the month saying that this move is of great risk.


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT greece.greekreporter.com

Greek Archaeological Body Approves New 5-year Excavation at Antikythera Shipwreck

An international archaeological expedition diving at the site of the Antikythera shipwreck in southern Greece has received the green light to continue its investigation in the area for the next five years, it was announced on Friday. The Greek Central Archaeological Council (KAS) approved the new test excavations which will focus on areas where a large number of pottery or metal objects have been discovered and in places where archaeologists have discovered evidence of one or two more shipwrecks. The last expedition, which was launched in 2012, was a collaboration between the Hellenic Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities and the American Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). During the first year of the expedition, archaeologists discovered and pulled up — among other things — a segment of an anchor and a lead joint from a Roman anchor. In 2013, the team completed a bathymetric chart of the island and the wreck’s location to determine the possible existence of a second Roman wreck close to the first one. During that investigation, archaeologists pulled up an anchor, a tile and an amphora, while in 2014 the team captured a digitized three-dimensional location of the wreck. Then they identified and pulled up two sections of a bed decoration and a bronze spear with a solid stem and lower tip. The cooperation between the Ephorate and WHOI is very important because of the latter’s specialized technical infrastructure, which allows deep sea research. The Institution also has at its disposal a new robotic diving apparatus called the Exosuit. This enables its occupant to dive at a depth of 300 meters without the need for decompression. The excavation is led by Dr Angeliki Simosi, head of the Ephorate, and WHOI’s marine archaeologist Brendan Foley. (source: ana-mpa)


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House Denounces Turkey for Crimes Against Cyprus’ Environment

President of the House of Representatives Yiannakis Omirou has pointed out that one must not forget the ecological destruction in the areas of Cyprus under Turkish occupation, noting that Turkey does not respect the Greek Cypriot properties or cultural and religious heritage, and continues its uncontrolled quarrying, unregulated development, and destruction of the archaeological and religious sites. Addressing an environmental award ceremony, Omirou said the House deplores Turkey for all these crimes against Cyprus` environment and demands that the international and European communities decisively intervene to put an end to this destruction. (source: CNA)


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Bloomberg: ‘Greeks Depart On Odyssey For Jobs’

The relocation of human capital has “bleeding” dimensions for Greece, a country that is steadily losing its “creme de la creme”, journalists Flavia Krause-Jackson and Jordan Yadoo refer in their article entitled “Greece Is Hemorrhaging Its Most Talented Workers” recently published in Bloomberg news agency. “Brain drain,” a popular term adopted in the 1960s in Britain for the hordes of scientists who were leaving the country for North America, has serious consequences for the economy. Losing its most talented employees a country has less tax revenues because of the fact that the competent professionals earn more money from their jobs and thus contribute more to their country’s economy. Furthermore, this way a country loses potential future entrepreneurs. From 2009 to 2014, the number of qualified people who sought permanent jobs abroad was 20,281 people according to Eurostat, while in early 2000, the corresponding figures were 2,552 people. According to Bloomberg, one should not be deceived by German figures being higher than Greece’s, as Germany has eight times the population of tiny Greece and the number of talented people leaving this developed country is the same with the number of people arriving to seek a job in it. Greece cannot afford to lose more smart people because it could be more difficult to bounce back and repay its lenders, emphasizes Bloomberg. But who can blame the talented young people who want to flee when faced with an unemployment rate that surpasses even that of Libya, the journalists are wondering in their article.


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT greece.greekreporter.com

EU's Juncker declines Tsipras phone call as promised proposals missing

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker declined on Saturday to take a phone call from Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras because Athens has not yet sent in reform proposals that it promised for Thursday, an EU official said. "The Greek prime minister requested a phone call for 1100 CET on Saturday, but Juncker declined because there has been no progress in the discussions and proposals that the Greek side promised on Wednesday night to deliver on Thursday have not arrived," the official said. Tsipras was also due to return to Brussels for further discussions in person on Friday, but didn't.


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT uk.news.yahoo.com

Opposition Parties Assail Tsipras Negotiations Strategy, SYRIZA Infighting

ATHENS – The leader of the opposition party Potami, Stavros Theodorakis, urged the SYRIZA-led government on Friday to resolve the internal strife facing the main coalition party and to push for a national consensus ahead of the next round of negotiations with Greece’s lenders. Speaking at an off-the agenda parliamentary debate that Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras […] The post Opposition Parties Assail Tsipras Negotiations Strategy, SYRIZA Infighting appeared first on The National Herald.


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Clock ticks for Greek PM as debt deal deadline looms

Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras is facing a showdown both with international creditors and dissenters in his party as his government toils to reach a default-saving loan deal in less than a month.


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Greek officials play down snap election option in debt stand off

ATHENS Greek government officials on Saturday played down the possibility of early elections to break an impasse with the country's creditors the day ...


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Putin Warns Against Speculation Over Greece’s Eurozone Future

Speculation over Greece ’s possible exit from the Eurozone (“Grexit”) amid the country’s massive debt could be harmful both to the European Union and the Greek economy, Russian President Vladimir Putin said in an interview with Italian newspaper Il Corriere della Sera ahead of his visit to Milan. “We are developing relations with Greece regardless of whether it is a member of the EU, is part of the Eurozone or is a NATO member. We have very close historical partnership ties with Greece,” Putin said, stressing that it is the “sovereign right” of the Greek people to decide on different alliance and zone memberships. The Russian president added that it could be harmful to the Greek and EU economy to speculate on the future development of events in Greece. (source: Sputnik)


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