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Welcome, 77 artists, 40 different points of Attica welcomes you by singing Erotokritos an epic romance written at 1713 by Vitsentzos Kornaros

Monday, November 17, 2014

20,000 Join Annual November 17 Protest March to US Embassy in Athens

ATHENS, Greece — Protesters clashed briefly with riot police during an otherwise peaceful rally of 20,000 people in Athens Monday to mark the 41st anniversary of a deadly student uprising against the country’s former dictatorship. Police used tear gas and stun grenades to disperse a few dozen demonstrators who were breaking up paving stones to […] The post 20,000 Join Annual November 17 Protest March to US Embassy in Athens appeared first on The National Herald.


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REVIEW: 'Iphigenia in Aulis' at Court Theatre

The decision by Agamemnon to butcher Iphigenia, merely in service of grabbing a few puffs of friendly wind for stuck Greek ships, seems so remote as ...


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Greeks march to commemorate 1973 uprising

Thousands of Greeks have taken to the streets of the capital, Athens, to commemorate the 1973 student uprising against the country's US-backed ...


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Court’s objective values demand is ‘impossible’

The adjustment of Greece’s so-called objective property values (used for tax purposes) within the next six months is impossible, according to Finance Ministry officials who stressed that the amount of data involved in changing the values to represent the ... ...


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Uber brings ride-sharing to Greece

Smartphone and tablet app Uber has arrived in Greece, allowing non-professional drivers to turn their private cars into taxis and offer transport services, despite having drawn a strong reaction from cabbies. The ride-sharing service through Uber is likel... ...


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Hoteliers cautious about next tourism season

The first signs for the next tourism season in Greece are particularly positive, given the bookings to date from certain major markets, statements by tour operator officials and airlines’ schedules, a Hellenic Hoteliers Federation conference heard over th... ...


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Over 30000 march in Greece to remember student uprising

Some 32,000 people took to the streets of Greece on Monday to mark the 41st anniversary of a deadly student uprising that sparked the country's ...


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This Is What It's Like To Be Directed By Jon Stewart

"Rosewater," the feature film directorial debut by Jon Stewart, was released in theaters Friday. It depicts the experiences of Maziar Bahari, an Iranian-Canadian journalist who was arrested in Tehran and imprisoned for 118 days. Bahari had previously appeared on "The Daily Show," which prompted Iranian authorities to detain him as a spy. HuffPost Entertainment spoke to Gael Garcia Bernal about his role as Bahari and what it was like to be a part of Stewart's first movie. What was it like working with Jon Stewart? Tell me about his directorial style. He’s a very experienced director. What I mean by that is he’s been working with a large group of people for 15 years. He was capable of growing "The Daily Show." So, there are many things that are no so different from that experience in the groundwork of it. It is not that different. But there are things that make it very complicated and different from making a TV show. He’s a very intelligent person. Very mature. He’s doing the film for the right reasons. Therefore, he was very willing to learn and open up, to understand. There's a lot of humor here considering this is a film about torture. How did you find that balance? The humor was found by Maziar Bahari, through his imprisonment and through his recount of the imprisonment he expressed the ridiculousness of the situation. It’s all there. It was all there in Maziar’s book and then Jon’s interpretation and whatever we had to do, we just had to find the balance. There’s sometimes not a balance even. Sometimes it was more tragic than funny and sometimes it was more funny than tragic. You also worked very closely with Maziar. What was it like being in such close connection to the man you were playing? I was playing an interpretation of his account. So, there are conflicts that already exist there. Added to that is the fact that we were doing it in English. We weren’t doing it in Farsi. So, that creates an interpretation. Already, it is a different character than the real character. So, Maziar was there and he was kind enough to observe us, to enjoy the work that we were doing, to let us in that world, and it was fun. It was very kind of him. There was some backlash to the fact that Jon cast you, a Mexican actor, as an Iranian character. How would you respond to that? Well, it happened in Tehran, but it was shot in Jordan. It’s in English, not in Farsi. The person that plays Rosewater is a Danish actor. The person who plays my father is a Turkish actor. The person who plays the friend of Maziar is an English-Greek actor. There are Egyptians in the film. There are many artists with a background in Iraq or Palestine or Syria. So, we were from all over the world. And it was a director from New Jersey. And I’m from Mexico. And I understand the subject on a human level. Of course I do. But definitely I’m not from Iran, and I’m from the places or nationality of many characters that I’ve interpreted in my life. I’ve never interpreted a character from Guadalajara, from where I’m from. So, it’s part of the nature of all this, to create a bigger fable. What do you hope audiences take away from "Rosewater"? Many things, many questions. I think among the many questions the film asks, it highlights the persecution of journalists all over the world. This is a film about those big issues, not about Iran itself. There is a question about the nature of prison and how torture is systematically used all over the world to put people in a guilty position. In even the most sophisticated democracies, it is something that is commonly used. Like many stories, it is about the triumph of the human spirit. This interview has been edited and condensed.


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Greek bond yields buck the trend

Yields on most lower-rated eurozone bonds fell on Monday after European Central Bank President Mario Draghi said unconventional monetary policy measures could include buying sovereign bonds. Draghi also said the ECB will continue to do “whatever it takes”... ...


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Man DECAPITATED in horror road smash with lorry in Stockport

"Road closures are currently in place on Wellington Road South, Greek Street, Lowfield Road, Longshut Lane, Buxton Road, Bramhall Lane and ...


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Fearing Ebola surge, Mali widens virus watch

Bamako (AFP) - Fearful of a surge of Ebola cases, Mali placed more than 440 people under surveillance, as a US hospital said Monday it had been unable to save the life of a doctor airlifted from Sierra Leone.Officials in Mali met to consider increasing security at its border following two confirmed cases of Ebola due to infection in neighbouring Guinea. US airports also announced plans to begin enhanced screening of travelers from the west African nation.Mali has been scrambling to prevent a minor outbreak from turning into a major crisis after the deaths of a Guinean imam and the Malian nurse who treated him in the capital Bamako.A friend who had visited the imam in the Pasteur clinic also died of probable Ebola and a two-year-old child died from the disease last month in an unconnected case in the western town of Kayes. "The number of contacts followed by health services amounts to 442. They have all been placed under observation for health control," Samba Sow, of the Ebola emergency operations center, said in a statement late Sunday.Teams of investigators have been tracking health workers and scouring Bamako and the imam's village of Kouremale, which straddles the Mali-Guinea border, for people who could have been exposed.The European Union on Monday pledged 12 million euros ($15 million) in funding to Mali, Senegal and Ivory Coast amid growing fears Ebola could spread in the region.The money would help the countries "prepare for the risk of an Ebola outbreak through early detection and public awareness measures."The World Health Organization announced on Friday that the outbreak -- almost entirely confined to west Africa -- has killed 5,177 people and infected around 14,500 since Ebola emerged in Guinea in December. The virus is estimated to have killed around 70 percent of its victims across west Africa, often shutting down their organs and causing massive bleeding. - Enhanced screening -  US authorities on Monday began enhanced Ebola screenings of travelers from Mali, adding it to a list of three other west African countries -- Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea -- where the measures were already in place.The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in a joint statement with the Department of Homeland Security, said Mali was added to the list "because there have been a number of confirmed cases of Ebola" there in recent days."A large number of individuals may have been exposed to those cases," the statement said."The action is warranted as a precaution due to the possibility that other cases of Ebola may emerge in Mali in the coming days," the statement said.The United States said about 15-20 travelers depart Mali each day en route to the United States.Those arriving will be checked for fever and subject to the 21-day monitoring and movement protocols already in effect for travelers from Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea.Meanwhile, a cargo ship on its way from Guinea to Ukraine reported it had a crew member with possible symptoms of Ebola, and prepared to drop anchor off Athens so doctors could board to examine him.If confirmed, it would be the first case in Greece of the hemorrhagic virus.And in Guinea, the United Nations envoy charged with leading the Ebola response in that country, Rwandan national Marcel Rudasingwa, died on Monday. - Surgeon is mourned -  In Nebraska, medical staff mourned the death of a surgeon infected in Sierra Leone who died about a day after being airlifted to a specialized US hospital.Martin Salia, 44, was a US resident who had been working at a hospital near Freetown. The married father of two was suffering multiple organ failure by the time he arrived in the United States on Saturday."Dr. Salia was extremely critical when he arrived here, and unfortunately, despite our best efforts, we weren't able to save him," said Phil Smith, medical director of the bio-containment unit at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.In Washington, the White House extended condolences to the doctors family, praising him as a man who "dedicated his life to saving others.""Dr. Salia's passing is another reminder of the human toll of this disease and of the continued imperative to tackle this epidemic on the frontlines, where Dr. Salia was engaged in his calling," White House press secretary Josh Earnest said.A spokesman for Sierra Leone's government, Abdulaye Bayratay, said it was "so sad for us to lose another doctor."Salia and his wife, Isatu, lived in New Carrollton, Maryland, a suburb of the US capital Washington. They have two children, age 12 and 20.Join the conversation about this story »


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Critic's Choice: Court Theatre captures Greek tragedy

Greek troops under the king's command are grounded in the port city and unable to advance on Troy. Calchas, a soothsayer, reveals that before the ...


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Bread, Education, Freedom: 41 Years After the Greek Junta

This slogan takes on renewed meaning today as more than 20,000 Greeks participated in Monday's demonstration, protesting how seven years of ...


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Greece tourism claims Australian landmark

Greece's national tourism agency has been caught out using the picturesque rock formation to depict the Greek coastline in its new international tourism campaign. The embarrassing blunder has been compounded by "preposterous" claims by the Greek tourism ...


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Travel Back in Time to These Amazing Ancient Cities

The world's oldest cities are once-in-a-lifetime destinations, places that effortlessly inspire awe and put you in the shoes of a time traveler. To walk labyrinthine streets, marvel at crumbling fortress walls, or see kings' tombs that have endured thousands of years is to experience a fleeting moment of what life was like for the first civilizations on Earth. Read on to be transported to 10 ancient cities (without travel advisories) where you can take part in age-old rituals and learn about the legends that have been passed down for more generations than you can ever fathom. Amesbury, England First Inhabited: 8th millennium BCE Hundreds of prehistoric burial grounds are scattered in and around Amesbury, and Stonehenge, just two miles away, sits in the middle of them. Archaeological evidence suggests that Amesbury's first inhabitants--who settled in England's River Avon valley at the site of what has historically been an important river crossing--predate even Stonehenge. Amesbury, the home of Stonehenge, is also linked with the legend of King Arthur. As the story goes, Guinevere came to the convent here after leaving Arthur, and she is buried on the grounds of the former abbey. What to See: At Stonehenge's new visitor center, check out artifacts unearthed from burial sites and tour an outdoor cluster of recreated Neolithic houses from the period. Walk around the Stonehenge circle, listening to the audio tour on headphones to learn about the site's mysteries and why it may have been located here. The Amesbury Museum and Heritage Centre displays huge quantities of handcrafted flint tools that predate Stonehenge by more than 5,000 years. Athens, Greece First Inhabited: 5th to 4th millennium BCE Think of ancient Athens and likely the first image that comes to mind is the Parthenon, the 5th century BCE temple dedicated to the goddess Athena. But archaeologists say this Acropolis site on the rocky bluff was inhabited thousands of years before the Parthenon existed and thousands of years before Plato, Socrates, and Aristotle walked the city streets. The ancient home of philosophy and birthplace of Western civilization, Athens also has bragging rights as the first host city of the modern Olympic Games. What to See: Climb up to the Acropolis on a walking tour. See displays of striking classical sculptures and watch curators restore similar marble statues with laser technology at the Acropolis Museum. Along the historic Plaka neighborhood's narrow, labyrinthine streets, you'll find neoclassical mansions, ancient monuments, and scores of churches. Run on the Olympic track and get your photo taken on the winner's podium at the Panathenaic Stadium. Fayoum, Egypt First Inhabited: 4000 BCE About 60 miles southwest of Cairo, Fayoum is part of Egypt's largest oasis, where the pharaohs built pleasure palaces and the Greeks built temples paying homage to the Lake Moeris (Lake Qaroun) crocodiles they believed were sacred. Fayoum, called Crocodilopolis by the Greeks, became the most significant center for the cult of Sobek, the crocodile god. Ruins of two temples dedicated to Sobek still stand today. The modern city is home to large bazaars, mosques, and baths. What to See: Don't miss Madinat Madi, the largest surviving temple of the intermediate period of the Pharaonic era. At the three-floor Qaroun Palace, you'll see a king's throne, wall drawings, and inscriptions that date to 323 BCE. The Hawwara and Al-Lahun pyramids are nearby. Other interesting archaeological sites include the Whale Valley fossil area, an open museum with whale skeletons, shark teeth, and petrified shells and corals. Plovdiv, Bulgaria First Inhabited: 3000 to 4000 BCE In south-central Bulgaria, near the border of both Greece and Turkey, is the beautiful "City of Seven Hills," originally a Thracian city before it changed hands under the rule of the Greeks, Romans, and Russians. Today, you can still see the influences those cultures left behind in Plovdiv's cobblestone streets, fortress walls, Roman amphitheater and aqueduct, and Ottoman baths. High on the naturally fortified northern hill of the three-hill massif Nebet Tepe is the site of the original prehistoric settlement. What to See: Walk through the archaeological complex at Nebet Tepe and Old Town's museums and galleries. Go to a performance in the Ancient Theatre, a restored first-century open-air venue made of marble that was originally used for theatrical performances and gladiators' and hunting games. Nearby in the Roman Stadium, athletic contests were held in 2 CE. The city was named the European Capital of Culture 2019. Gaziantep, Turkey First Inhabited: 3650 BCE Previously known as Antioch and as Antep, the city of Gaziantep lies where the Mediterranean meets Mesopotamia, an area considered the center of the first civilizations. In 300 BCE, Alexander the Great's generals founded Zeugma (now part of Gaziantep) before it was conquered and ruled by the Roman Empire as an important outpost on the Silk Road to China. Several ancient sites remain in Gaziantep and 13 different museums house impressive collections of artifacts. What to See: Check out the remains of baths and cisterns in the Ravanda citadel, restored by the Byzantines in the sixth century. Nearby are several 15th-century mosques and caravanserais, which once provided lodging, food and refuge to passing caravans. The Zeugma Mosaic Museum, one of the world's largest mosaic museums, displays massive pieces dating from the first century BCE. Shop for baklava and yemeni (shoes made from local leather) at the city's two well-known bazaars. Luxor, Egypt First Inhabited: 3200 BCE This city was the capital of the ancient Egyptian empire during its heyday. The Nile River cuts through the center of Luxor, dividing the modern city on the East Bank from the ancient necropolis and mortuary temples on the West Bank. Legends say ancient Egyptians buried their dead on the West Bank because the setting sun in that direction symbolized the journey to the afterlife. The West Bank is where you'll find the tomb of King Tutankhamun and tombs of other ancient kings and queens. The East Bank, which symbolized life for the ancient Egyptians, boasts some of the country's most upscale hotels and spas. What to See: Visit the Valley of the Kings and the Valley of the Queens, the West Bank's grand-scale tombs. Find hundreds of relics in the Luxor Museum, overlooking the Nile River. The Avenue of Sphinxes connecting the Karnak Temple and Luxor Temple is lined with 1,350 sphinx statues. Visit the temples at night for a completely different experience. Jerusalem, Israel First Inhabited: 2800 BCE This beloved city and holy place of the three monotheistic religions was long considered the center of the world. Ancient maps show Jerusalem at the middle of the three continents known at the time: Europe, Asia, and Africa. Set high in the Jerusalem Hills, this is the place where the Jews built the temple, where Jesus was crucified, and where Muhammad rose to heaven. The Old City's narrow streets lead you past towering stone walls and ancient buildings that have survived centuries of destruction and resurrection. What to See: At the base of the massive Western Wall, Judaism's holiest site, write a prayer or wish and wedge it into the cracks. Follow the Via Dolorosa, the road Jesus walked that leads from the courthouse site where he was sentenced to Golgotha Hill where he was killed. Other must-see sites are the Church of the Holy Sepulcher, the Temple Mount, Mount of Olives, Garden of Gethsemane, and Yad Vashem. Luoyang, China First Inhabited: Around 2070 BCE Asia's oldest continuously inhabited city, Luoyang was considered to be the geographical center and one of the four great ancient capitals of China. It lies on the north or sunny (yang) side of the Luo River where it converges with the Yi River. Stunning mountains surround the city, where Chinese Buddhist temples and monuments are carved into the sides of hills. As a capital of several dynasties, Luoyang has become a city renowned for its culture and recognized by UNESCO for its heritage sites. What to See: At the Longmen Grottoes, there are 2,345 niches for Buddha, 100,000 statues, and 2,800 calligraphic inscriptions. Be prepared to climb several hillside steps to see the most majestic of statues. Take a bus just outside of town for a visit to the first Buddhist temple in China: White Horse Temple, a small and uncommercialized temple with many monks. Kutaisi, Georgia Inhabited Since: Around 2000 BCE Just north of Turkey, at the crossroads where Europe meets Asia, is Kutaisi, Georgia, the former capital of the country and the land of the Golden Fleece. While this city, originally part of the Colchis kingdom, dates to ancient times, it is perhaps best known for its place in Greek mythology. According to the epic Greek poem, Jason and his Argonauts were said to have traveled to Kutaisi to find the Golden Fleece. The city's magnificent Renaissance heritage sites from the 10th to 12th centuries are well preserved and offer terrific views overlooking the city, the surrounding mountain ranges, and the Rioni River. What to See: The Bagrati Cathedral and Gelati Monastery are both UNESCO World Heritage sites. The monastery, where the most celebrated king of Georgia is buried, is known for its mosaics and frescoes. Not far from the city are two caves, one with dinosaur footprints and the other offering boat trips on an underground river. Varanasi, India First Inhabited: Around 1200 to 1100 BCE India's oldest city, Varanasi is also one of the holiest city in the world. The god Shiva is believed to have lived in the area and a major shrine here honors this lord of the universe. Pilgrims travel from as far away as 1,250 miles to visit the shrine and bathe in the city's sacred Ganges River. Every day, thousands of locals and pilgrims immerse themselves or come to die in these waters that are said to have absolved the sins of many generations. Along the water's edge, ghats (riverfront steps) associated with Hindu mythology are sacred sites for yoga, cremation, or meditation and worship with prayer and fire. What to See: Don't miss Varanasi's various temples and ghats. The Vishwanath Temple, dedicated to Shiva, is closed to non-Hindus but others can recognize it by its golden spire. Visit an excavated site in the Sarnath area of town and see a large collection of Buddhist sculptures in the Sarnath Museum. Read the original story: Travel Back in Time to These Amazing Ancient Cities by Jamie Moore, who is a regular contributor to SmarterTravel. You Might Also Like: 10 Ancient Ruins That Prove All Roads Lead to Rome 13 Eerie Abandoned Places You Can Visit Truly Authentic Cultural Food Experiences Around the World


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Immigrants launch hunger strike after Pakistani dies in Greek detention camp

ATHENS: Hundreds of illegal immigrants being held at a Greek detention centre launched a hunger strike Monday to protest the death of a Pakistani ...


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Greek foreign minister warns Turkey over breach of Cyprus EEZ

Greece has warned Turkey that its continued violation of Cyprus’s sovereign rights could jeopardize the nation’s EU membership ambitions. Speaking on the sidelines of a Foreign Affairs Council meeting in Brussels on Monday, Foreign Minister Evangelos Veni... ...


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DNA tests on Amphipolis tomb remains pose major challenge

As speculation mounts following the discovery of human remains at a huge ancient tomb at Amphipolis, northern Greece, Culture Ministry’s general secretary Lina Mendoni revealed on Monday that it could take more than eight months for experts to complete DN... ...


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Thousands of Greeks march against austerity to mark 1973 uprising

ATHENS (Reuters) - Tens of thousands of Greeks poured into the streets to march against austerity on Monday in one of the biggest anniversary protests in recent years to mark a bloody 1973 student revolt against the then-ruling military junta.


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Greeks march on Athens US embassy to protest killings

Thousands have rallied across Greece to mark the anniversary of the former dictatorship's suppression of dissent. Police used tear gas and stun grenades to disperse demonstrators at some spots.


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Immigrants launch hunger strike over death, conditions in Greece

Greece is one of the key ports of entry into Europe for many thousands of migrants every year. It has frequently been criticised for poor conditions in its ...


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China Could Be the Next Greece; Avoid Teck Resources Inc. and Suncor Energy Inc.

In a guest op-ed for The Globe and Mail, finance professor George Athanassakos predicts that China will become the next Greece. He makes some ...


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Macedonia, Greece continue to accuse each other over name talks deadlock

17 November 2014, Skopje-Shkup, dtt-net.com – Macedonian and Greek governments have continued to accuse each-other over the deadlock ...


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Bourse trading volume hits new year-low

Turnover at the Greek bourse slumped to a 14-month low on Monday as investors hold back due to the uncertainty hanging over negotiations between the government and its creditors. The Athens Exchange (ATHEX) general index ended at 881.76 points, shedding 1... ...


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Turkish submarine, Greek gunboat face in dangerous confrontation

Turkish submarine has suddenly emerged to the surface some two miles off the Turkish coast in the Aegean sea, dangerously facing a Greek gunboat ...


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Voices: A student response to West Virginia University's darkest hour

It is beyond the scope of a young college student such as myself to comprehend just how painful it must be to anyone who knew the fellow Greek ...


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Greeks Rescue Historic Building in Melbourne

Loco Hall, a historic building in North Melbourne that was originally built in 1914, was saved thanks to the Panarcadian Association of Melbourne “O ...


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PROTESTERS CLASH WITH GREEK RIOT POLICE IN 1973 UPRISING COMMEMORATION

ATHENS — Riot police clashed with hooded youths on Monday as more than 30,000 people marched through Athens during an annual rally to ...


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National Bank of Greece : says will sell 2.25% of its Turkish unit Finansbank in SPO

National Bank of Greece (NBG) will proceed with a secondary offering of existing shares in Finansbank, currently held by NBG, of a nominal value of TRY80mn (€28.5mn) corresponding to approximately 2.25% of the paid-in capital of Finansbank post SCI ...


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Under-21 manager Tsanas to coach Greece vs Serbia

Greece named youth coach Costas Tsanas as interim coach of the senior national team on Sunday but there was no official confirmation yet of the sacking of Italian Claudio Ranieri. The country's soccer federation (EPO) has effectively suspended Ranieri for... ...


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Greek minister discharged from Istanbul hospital

Education Minister Andreas Loverdos was discharged from a hospital in Istanbul on Monday after being admitted on Saturday with intense lower-back pain. Doctors said the minister, who was on an official visit to Istanbul to meet Greek Orthodox Church offic... ...


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Two suspects to testify before prosecutor in heroin probe

A businessman under investigation for leasing a tanker that is believed to have carried around 2 tons of heroin to Greece in June is to appear before the Piraeus prosecutor handling the probe into Greece’s biggest ever drug bust on Tuesday. The 52-year-ol... ...


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KEELPNO Dismisses Rumors of Ebola Case on Greek Ship

Greek port authorities were alarmed on Monday afternoon due to a suspected Ebola case on a ship which would be arriving in Piraeus at 5:30 pm. According to information released by the Greek Mercantile Marine Ministry, tanker “MAGDA P” was performing a route from Guinea to Ukraine when a crew member fell ill. His symptoms suggested that he may be suffering from the Ebola virus. The Hellenic Center for Disease Control and Prevention (KEELPNO), however, stated that there was no reason for alarm, since the incident does not reflect the virus’ nature. The ship’s captain sated that crew members never came in contact with infected people in Guinea, since they never disembarked. Furthermore, the few local workers who boarded the ship, had been strictly checked before they were granted entrance. KEELPNO doctors will visit the ship in order to confirm the epidemiological data and examine the patient. Greece has undertaken special emergency measures after the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the virus outbreak an international health emergency. The Greek government has alerted all related authorities to immediately report any possible incidents and has also warned citizens to avoid non-essential travels to Nigeria, Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.


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Greek ship due in Athens port to screen crew for Ebola

Port police said that the Magda P., a bulk carrier owned by Greek shipping company Common Progress and carrying 24 crew, 10 of them Greek and ...


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Greece: 20,000 join peaceful annual rally to US embassy, marking deadly uprising

More than 20,000 demonstrators have joined a peaceful rally in Athens marking the 41st anniversary of a deadly student uprising against the country's former dictatorship.


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Make better latkes with a quick boiling water bath

In terms of flavor, smoky and spicy play off the sweetness perfectly. Sweet potato soup with adobo or chipotle Greek yogurt is pretty perfect in that way.


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Tourism: Greece, major investment projects get go-ahead

(ANSAmed) - ATHENS, NOVEMBER 17 - Next summer in Greece will likely see construction start on two major tourism and housing investment ...


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Health: suspected Ebola case reported on ship off Greece

(ANSAmed) - ATHENS, NOVEMBER 17 - A suspected Ebola case has been reported in a ship just off the Peloponnesian coat as daily To Vima online ...


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Stocks Closed in Green

National Bank of Greece (ADR) (NYSE:NBG) finished last trade at $2.22, gaining+4.23%. Trading volume recorded for this company was about 3.57 ...


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European Central Bank's Draghi says Greece reaping rewards from its economic reforms

by  Associated Press ECB's Draghi: government bond purchases possible by PAN PYLAS, Associated Press - 17 November 2014 11:03-05:00 LONDON (AP) — European Central Bank President Mario Draghi said Monday that the bank stands ready to buy government bonds if inflation in the 18-country eurozone fails to rise as anticipated, a hint that helped shore up stock markets and put pressure on the euro. Addressing lawmakers of the European Parliament on Monday, Draghi said the bank's governing council remains unanimous in its commitment to using additional unconventional instruments within its mandate. "Other unconventional measures might entail the purchase of a variety of assets, one of which is government bonds," Draghi said. The ECB is tasked with ensuring price stability across the 18-country eurozone, which it defines as annual inflation of just below 2 percent. In the year to October, inflation stood at only 0.4 percent. Draghi said the bank continues to expect inflation will remain at current levels for a few more months but that it will start rising again next year. Though the ECB has cut interest rates to record lows and backed the purchase of some types of private-sector bonds, it has refrained from following other central banks such as the U.S. Federal Reserve and the Bank of England in buying government bonds — so-called quantitative easing, or QE. Proponents of QE reckon that the policy could help shore up the European economic recovery by reducing borrowing costs across the board for businesses, households as well as governments. Most ECB watchers think it is unlikely to back large-scale government bond purchases at its next meeting in December but that it remains a possibility if the eurozone economy fails to pick up momentum early next year or if inflation turns to deflation. A sustained drop in prices can choke economic activity if consumers put off purchases in the hope of bargains down the line. Stocks were buoyed by Draghi's comments — a QE program would create new money that often ends up in financial markets. Both Germany's DAX and France's CAC-40 stock indexes turned around during Draghi's testimony with both trading 0.7 percent higher toward the close. The euro was also pressured by Draghi's comments, trading 0.6 percent lower at $1.2461. The prospect of more money in the system tends to weaken the currency. Draghi said monetary policy alone can only do so much and once again urged governments across Europe to pursue structural reforms. Monetary policy works better alongside reforms, he said. Specifically, he singled out Greece as a country that is seeing the benefits "accruing" from its wide-ranging economic reforms. Greece grew by a quarterly rate of 0.7 percent in the third quarter. That made Greece, which has contracted every year since 2008, the fastest-growing eurozone economy in the quarter. News Topics: Business, Economy, Inflation, Government securities, Government bonds, Government policy, Stock indices and averages, Central banking, Prices, Government debt, Government finance, Government business and finance, Government and politics, Debt and bond markets, Financial markets, Stock markets, Banking and credit, Financial services, Industries People, Places and Companies: Mario Draghi, Europe, Greece, Western Europe Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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Greece: 20,000 join annual protest to US embassy

ATHENS, Greece (AP) — More than 20,000 demonstrators have joined a peaceful rally in Athens marking the 41st anniversary of a deadly student uprising against the country's former dictatorship.


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After student's death, West Virginia University suspends Greek life, website reports

Friends and family of Nolan Burch console each other during a vigil for the student, who died after collapsing at a frat house party at West Virginia ...


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT www.nola.com

How much does it really cost to go Greek?

But with new member fees, chapter dues, social expenses and fines, Greek life can cost hundreds and even thousands of dollars a year on top of ...


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT college.usatoday.com

Pedestrian killed in horrific accident with a lorry in Stockport

The pedestrian, who has yet to be identified, was on Wellington Road South, near its junction with Greek Street, Stockport centre. The tragedy ...


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk

5.2 magnitude earthquake in northern Greece

A 5.2-magnitude earthquake struck northern Greece early Saturday, the country's earthquake observatory said, with no reports of victims or major damage. The tremor struck at 3:16 am (0016 GMT), with its epicentre 20 kilometres (12 miles) from the ...


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT en.tengrinews.kz

ECB's Draghi: Government Bond Purchases Possible

European Central Bank's Draghi says Greece reaping rewards from its economic reforms


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT abcnews.go.com

Greece’s Troika Talks Snag, Lenders Hang Tough On Reforms

Greek Prime Minister Antonis Samaras' hopes of getting the country's international lenders to return and finish a review before a critical Eurozone meeting on Dec. 8 have reportedly hit a roadblock because the coalition government has failed to complete critical reforms. The post Greece’s Troika Talks Snag, Lenders Hang Tough On Reforms appeared first on The National Herald.


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Turkish submarine confronts Greek coast guard in fishing standoff

A group of Turkish fishermen told the Do─čan News Agency that the Greek coast guard, which left its base on the island of Kos, violated Turkish ...


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT www.hurriyetdailynews.com

Euro 2016: Greek Tragedy for Claudio Ranieri as Former Roma Boss Sacked

Claudio Ranieri's contract as Greece coach has been terminated, after the national side's 1-0 loss to the Faroe Islands. SWOL partner FUBO.tv brings ...


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT www.swol.co

ECB's Draghi says Greece reaping reform benefits

European Central Bank President Mario Draghi says Greece is starting to reap the rewards from its wide-ranging economic reforms. Addressing lawmakers of the European Parliament on Monday, Draghi highlighted ...


READ THE ORIGINAL POST AT news.yahoo.com